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Jazz Music

Eric Dolphy, Tenderly

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Eric Dolphy (alto saxophone, flute, bass clarinet)6th track from Dolphy's "Far Cry" album. Recorded at the Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey on December 21, 1960. Originally released on New Jazz (8270).
Eric Dolphy (alto saxophone, flute, bass clarinet); Booker Little (trumpet); Jaki Byard (piano); Ron Carter (bass); Roy Haynes (drums).

"Tenderly" is a popular song published in 1946 with music by Walter Gross and lyrics by Jack Lawrence. Copyright 1946 by Edwin H. Morris & Company, Inc. Originally written in the key of Eb as a waltz in 3/4 time, it has since been performed in 4/4 and has subsequently become a popular jazz standard.

Early recordings were by Sarah Vaughan, who recorded the song in 1946 and had a US pop hit with it in 1947;[1] and the Brazilian crooner and pianist Dick Farney (Farnésio Dutra e Silva) who recorded the song in 1947.[citation needed] Since then, "Tenderly" has been recorded by many artists, but perhaps the best-known version was by Rosemary Clooney. Clooney's recorded version reached only #17 on the Billboard magazine pop charts in early 1952, but it is more popular than the chart data would suggest, as is evidenced by the fact that Tenderly served as the theme song for Clooney's 1956-1957 TV variety show. The song featured in the 1953 film Torch Song.

Randy Brooks, trumpeter and leader of the top rated Randy Brooks Band, may be best known for their rendition of Tenderly as a most requested song of 1947.

A 1953/54 version of Eddie Cochran was released in 1997 on the album Rockin' It Country Style.

Far Cry is a jazz album by musician Eric Dolphy with trumpeter Booker Little, originally released in 1961 on New Jazz, a subsidiary of the Prestige label. Featuring their co-led quintet, it is the one of the few studio recordings of their partnership. It is also one of the earliest appearances of bassist Ron Carter on record. Dolphy took part in Ornette Coleman's Free Jazz session before recording this album on the same day.

 

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